Knowing is Sharing: Cultural Progress and Education

Education Square is proud to host the fourth event in our series, Knowing Is Sharing, with Prof. Sohier Al-Defrawy. She will present her findings from both her research and practice regarding development and its relation to education and culture.

Development depends on culture, as it represents society’s values, attitudes, beliefs, and ideas. Cultural aspects include discipline, hard work, and generosity. Education is the key factor in making these aspects at the hear of the development process. Our discussion will show varying routes to development in different countries (Ghana/ South Korea, Haiti/Barbados, Egypt/India). We will find out the most important cultural aspects and that led to development and progress in each of this situation, showing that culture is dynamic.

Prof. Sohier Al-Defrawy is a thinker and a writer in education. She founded the Culture and Education for Children and Families Organization. She is the author of Ana Wa Nahn (Us and I) which ingrains the value of the self in children and teach them life skills and manners. She also authored a lot of books about upbrining and equipping the youth for the job market. You check out Prof. Sohier Al-Defrawy’s Blog.

Crowdfunding & Education

Do you need to fund your educational initiative/organization? Do you hear the word “crowdfunding” a lot but don’t know what it means? Is there somebody who was able to fund their projects using donations in a sustainable manner?

 Hosted by Nahdet El-Mahrousa Association, Madad  will tell us what crowdfunding is, and how you can use Madad website to sustain your projects. Moreover, Educate Me Organization will be with us to tell us about their experience in crowdfunding in different ways.

Knowing is Sharing: Critical Thinking in Work and Life

In our 3rd event in Knowing is Sharing, Both Education Square and Namaa for Sustainable Development are hosting a workshop by Prof. Salwa Kotb titled “Critical Thinking in Work and Life”, Hosted by Nahdet El-Mahrousa

In this workshop, Prof. Salwa will talk to us about:

  1. The concept of thinking
  2. most important thinking patterns
  3. most common faulty ways of thinking
  4. distinguishing between different patterns
  5. what’s critical thinking? its components and properties
  6. The difference between critical thinking and other types of thinking
  7. how to distinguish critical thinking?
  8. The importance of critical thinking?
  9. How to spot the critical thinker?
  10. the difference between constructive, and destructive criticism, and different types of feed back
  11. What are the obstacles for critical thinking?
  12. How to overcome these obstacles?
  13. Most important critical thinking skills and their applications
  14. ways to grow our critical thinking skills in work and life
  15. how to evaluate the employee’s critical thinking skills?
  16. 19 pieces of advice to provide constructive criticism 

Prof. Salwa Kotb got her PhD in educational psychology and her master in mental health from Ain Shams University. In both her theses, she researched critical thinking and its importance in improving our minds. Moreover, she trained a large number of students, graduates, and parents on personal, Managerial, educational skills

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talks in Education: a Voice for the Passionate

.Talks in Education provides an open platform for everyone interested or involved in education. Together, we will discuss the big issues facing education and explore innovative ideas and projects aimed at solving them.

We at Education Square, Tahrir Academy, Torous Masr for Civil Work Organization, and 100 Days, responsible for 24h Hackathon, are all interested in the significance of sharing and expressing ideas to gain the biggest value possible. We invite you to honor our meeting in AUC Tahrir Campus.

You can forward your own questions for discussions, or share your experience in the association or the community you’re involved with.

Knowing is Sharing: The History of Egyptian Education – Farida Makar

Farida Makar is an Oxford Professor whose work focused teachers’ training from the 20th century onward. She’s presenting to us her research about the history of Egyptian education.

Knowing is Sharing is a series that aims to shed the light on research related to education and its issues, especially what have been carried out by Egyptian students during their academic study. We hold this meeting once a month, and all interested in education are welcome to join.

Everyone interested in education, or is leading an educational initiative is welcome to join us, and will help us in understanding the current state of civil work in Egypt’s education and improving it.

Knowing is Sharing: Civil Work and Education in Egypt – Naiera Abdelrahman

Stemming from our belief in the importance of learning and sharing knowledge, Education Square, in collaboration with Namaa for Sustainable Development, is starting “Knowing is Sharing”. The series aims to shed the light on research related to education and its issues, especially what have been carried out by Egyptian students during their academic study. We hold this meeting once a month, and all interested in education are welcome to join.

Our first meeting is titled “community-based organizations in education and their relationship to the nation”, based on the work of Naiera Abdelrahman, a researcher on political sociology in Sorbonne University.

Prof. Naiera Abdelrahman will present what she found in her research, especially issues related to those involved in education and their relationship to the nation. She also talks about creating alternatives for community-based initiatives in education.

Her research is based upon theories of civity society and the history of civil work in Egypt’s education, as well as meetings with the CEOs of more than 20 association and initiative in education.

Everyone interested in education, or is leading an educational initiative is welcome to join us, and will help us in understanding the current state of civil work in Egypt’s education and improving it. 

Innovation For Education Workshop

In Collaboration with Futures Factory, Innovation in Education workshop aims to discuss a number of problems facing Egyptian education, and having a more practical views to their solutions.

We welcome all students, in any age, and those who works in formal education. We also welcome start-ups and organization of civil society. In short, anyone interested in education is welcome to join.

Goal:

Finding practical solutions for issues facing Egyptian education

Content:

  1. Introduction.
  2. Specifying the problem.
  3. Finding types of people concerned with this problem.
  4. every group will focus on solving this problem for a particular type of people.
  5. Break
  6. Brainstorming and discussion
  7. Presenting suggested solutions.

Screening “A B C” & “A Normal Day”

It’s our pleasure to host a screening session for  the movies: “A B C”, and “A Normal Day”. The two movies picture the lives of Egyptian school teachers and students. The event will hosted with “Egypt’s Reneisance. There will be a follow-up discussion with Shireen Talaat, A B C director, about the movies, the state of education in Egypt, and how to improve it. This is a good chance for presenting chances and ideas for educational start-ups and projects aiming at improving Egyptian education.

About the movies:

A B C is a 20-min documentary, directed by Shireen Talaat. It explores the status of teachers under the current Egyptian education system, along with the abuses and assaults they deal with from students and families. A B C  discusses the crowdedness of Egyptian classrooms, and how our society thinkk they’re inferior.

A Normal Day is a 25-minute documentary. It discusses the students’ suffering inside classrooms and the physical abuse they face. That’s why the movie is called “A Normal Day”. It has become normal for a child to be hit and shamed under this corrupt educational system.

Both Movies have been nominated internationally in a number of festivals. They have been two candles inviting us to fix the Egyptian education system, one that has been corrupt even after the 25th of January.

Movie Screening “Schooling the World”

Today, volunteers build schools in traditional societies around the world, convinced that school is the only way to a ‘better’ life for indigenous children.

But is this true? What really happens when we replace a traditional culture’s canon of knowledge with our own? Does life really get better for its people?

We invite you to watch “SCHOOLING THE WORLD” followed by a discussion about the movie’s relevance to education in Egypt.

Movie trailer: